Volunteers

Email | Share | Print

Evelyn Hutchins

Biography

Evelyn Rahman Hutchins


Hutchins, Evelyn. (Rahman, Evelyn; Hamilton, Evelyn); b. August 1, 1910; Snohomish (Hamilton), Washington; AMB; Married; Photographer; Arrived in Spain on April 6, 1937; Served with the Republican Medical Services, Ambulance and truck driver; d. July 1982.

 

Sources: RA (under Rahman), Pacific NW, The Good Fight, The Volunteer, SSN.

Photograph: Evelyn Hutchins,  VALB/ALBA.

ALB Archival Materials

Search the Tamiment Archives

Images

Evelyn Hutchins, truck driver, in Spain.

Full Database Record

Last Name Hutchins
First/Middle Name Evelyn
Ethnicity
Ethnicity Note
Immigration Status
Religion
POW
AKA Last Name 1
AKA First / Middle 1
AKA Last Name 2
AKA First / Middle 2
DOB
City
State
Foreign Nation
Foreign Nation City
Alt Pob State, City
Family: Name
Family: Relationship
Family: Begin Date
Family: End Date
Family: Comments
Education HS
Education College / Univ 1
Education College/Univ Notes
Education College/Univ 2
Graduate or Doctoral Work
Graduate or Doctoral Work Notes
Prior Military Service
Passport #
Passport Series
Passport Reported Lost in Spain
Passport Age
Passport Date
PP or Known Address Street
PP or Known Address City
PP or Known Address State
ALT City
Alt State
Sail Date
Ship
Marital Status
Marital Notes
Vocation 1
Vocation 2
Vocation 3
Party Affiliation
Date Affiliation
ALT Affiliation
ALT date
ALT affiliation 2
Arrival (in Spain) Date
Units served with
Battle action
Rank
Returned Date
Returned other
WWII Service
DOD
Cause
Place Died City
KIA/MIA/Died other
KIA/MIA/Died other Date
KIA/MIA/Died other Location
KIA/MIA/Died other Battle
Additional Notes Evelyn Hutchins was born in Snohomish, Washington in 1910 and developed an independent spirit as a child. Her divorced mother was a worker and agitator for suffrage for women, her stepfather a maritime worker blacklisted on the west coast for striking. Evelyn moved to New York as a young woman to be a dancer, but wound up in sleazy burlesque clubs when the Depression forced her to accept any work. Educated in the school of hard knocks, she demanded respect as a feminist. When the Spanish Civil War broke out, she drove trucks to collect clothing and other humanitarian aid to ship to Spain, and when the call for recruits for the American Medical Bureau went out in late 1936, she volunteered to be an ambulance driver. However, the organizers considered her unqualified for the risky work because she was a woman. Hutchins continued to agitate for the opportunity and eventually convinced them to send her to Spain. There she served courageously as a truck driver, experiencing dangerous combat conditions on many occasions. After the war, the Yale University sociologist Dr. John Dollard interviewed Hutchins as part of a study on the meaning of fear in battle; his published work was used by the U.S. Army for morale training during World War II. Dollard’s interview, conducted around 1942, is excerpted and available in ALBA's website resources.