Volunteers

Email | Share | Print

Francesco Coco

Biography

Coco, Francesco. (Francisco), b. Italy; Italian American; Married; Barber; CP of Italy 1921 Secretary National Italian Fraction; (NOK 1311 Balcom Avenue, NYC); Age 41; Arrived in Spain on April 24, 1937; Served with the Garibaldis.

 

Source:  RA, Fond 545, Opis 3, Delo 874, ll. 33-39; AICVAS; “Francesco Coco,” CPC busta 1389; “Medaglioni: Francesco Coco” L’Unità Operaia, September 4, 1937; The Immigrant Labor Press in North America, 82; 

ALB Archival Materials

Search the Tamiment Archives

Full Database Record

Last Name Coco
First/Middle Name Francesco
Ethnicity
Ethnicity Note
Immigration Status
Religion
POW
AKA Last Name 1
AKA First / Middle 1
AKA Last Name 2
AKA First / Middle 2
DOB
City
State
Foreign Nation
Foreign Nation City
Alt Pob State, City
Family: Name
Family: Relationship
Family: Begin Date
Family: End Date
Family: Comments
Education HS
Education College / Univ 1
Education College/Univ Notes
Education College/Univ 2
Graduate or Doctoral Work
Graduate or Doctoral Work Notes
Prior Military Service
Passport #
Passport Series
Passport Reported Lost in Spain
Passport Age
Passport Date
PP or Known Address Street
PP or Known Address City
PP or Known Address State
ALT City
Alt State
Sail Date
Ship
Marital Status
Marital Notes
Vocation 1
Vocation 2
Vocation 3
Party Affiliation
Date Affiliation
ALT Affiliation
ALT date
ALT affiliation 2
Arrival (in Spain) Date
Units served with
Battle action
Rank
Returned Date
Returned other
WWII Service
DOD
Cause
Place Died City
KIA/MIA/Died other
KIA/MIA/Died other Date
KIA/MIA/Died other Location
KIA/MIA/Died other Battle
Additional Notes Coco had first been a member of the Socialist party and then among the charter members of the Communist party in 1921. Soon after his arrival in the United States, he was a central figure in the 1926 Communist-led textile workers strike in Passaic, New Jersey, during which he was arrested and fined for resisting arrest. The following year he helped found the short-lived Italian-language weekly Lotta di Classe, which served as the organ of the pro-Communist wing in the needle trades. Together with Ubaldo Cazzoli (a.k.a. Giulio Fantini) of the restaurant workers union, Coco was appointed to the Italian National Bureau of the Communist party of the United States where he helped unionize Italian workers. Excerpt